skip to primary navigationskip to content
 

Mentors

Mentors 

All Fellows are required to have a mentor based within their respective research departments. The mentor should not normally be the Fellow's PhD supervisor. 

To help applicants to identify potential mentors, we have provided links to the staff pages for each of our participating Departments below so that applicants can familiarise themselves with the interests of academic staff.  We have also published the details of staff who have specifically expressed an interest in being a mentor - this information will be updated on an on-going basis.  

If you are having difficulties identifying a suitable mentor, please get in touch at:  esrcpdf@admin.cam.ac.uk                                                                                                                              

Archaeology

Link to staff directory

Name: Prof. Marie Louise Stig Sorensen

Contact: mlss@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Prof. Sorensen is happy to consider mentoring for heritage related research.  She has been involved with coordinating graduate heritage teaching and research since 1990, and she is a foundling member of the Centre for Heritage Research at the University of Cambridge. Prof. Sorensen is especially interested in the links between heritage and identity formation, and has researched this in terms of both nationalism and conflict. She is interested in pursuing new research themes around heritage, especially gender and food.

Architecture

Link to staff directory

 

Business and Management

Link to staff directory

 

Criminology

Link to staff directory

 

Development Studies

Link to staff directory

 

Economics

Link to staff directory

 

Education

Link to staff directory

Name: Dr. Andreas Stylianides

Contact: as899@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Dr. Stylianides is happy to consider mentoring for research related to mathematics education. His research is committed to understanding and acting upon problems of classroom practice, especially problems related to mathematical reasoning, proving, and problem solving. A premise underlying this dual commitment is that, by engineering ways to address problems of practice, one develops also a better theoretical understanding of the processes (didactical, cognitive, epistemological, etc.) underpinning the problems. His research projects have addressed different levels of education and several other related topics including teachers’ knowledge and beliefs, and task design and implementation.

 

Name: Prof Keith S Taber

Contact: kst24@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Science education specialism. Chemistry graduate with secondary school teaching qualification in chemistry and physics, taught sciences in secondary schools (c.6 years) and science and research methods in further education working with 11-19 year olds and adult returners to education (c.17 years); during which DPSE, MSc, and PhD were completed by part-time study; before moving to Homerton College Cambridge and then to become a teaching officer of the University of Cambridge (c.18 years). Current teaching is primarily in educational research methods (especially general principles, qualitative methods) and research supervision (mostly for projects in science education). Research interests relate primarily to aspects of learning and teaching in science - in particular student conceptual understanding and progression, and learning and teaching about the nature of science.

Gender Studies

Link to staff directory

 

Geography

Link to staff directory

Name: Dr Alex Jeffrey

Contact: alex.jeffrey@geog.cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Alex's work examines the geopolitics of state building after conflict, focusing on three areas: 1) Geographies of state formation. This research has explored the role of non-governmental organisations(NGOs) in fostering democratic participation after violent conflict.

Over several periods of residential fieldwork in Bosnia and Herzegovina Alex has sought to investigate how donors, new state institutions and intervening agencies shape the agendas of NGOs. This work was the basis for the monograph entitled The Improvised State: Sovereignty, Performance and Agency in Dayton Bosnia (2013, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford).2) Legal Geopolitics. This strand of research has explored the geography of war crimes trials after conflict, and their implications for understandings of the state, citizenship and justice. Between 2011-13, Alex was Principal Investigator on a two-year ESRC First Grant entitled Localising International Law exploring how the War Crimes Chamber in Sarajevo has communicated with victim populations. 3) Citizenship in Divided Societies. This strand of research seeks to explore how ideas of citizenship are negotiated, contested and learnt following periods of political instability.

Between 2012-2017 Alex was an Academic Fellow on a European Research Council Advanced Grant entitled Youth Experiences of Citizenship in Divided Societies: Between Cosmopolitanism, Nation, and Civil Society" (Principal Investigator Professor Lynn Staeheli).

Name: Dr Charlotte Lemanski

Contact: cll52@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: An urban geographer, researching urban life from the perspective of low-income urban dwellers in the global South (specifically India and South Africa). Charlotte's research focuses on housing, infrastructure, urban governance and citizenship, as well as the advocating for the global South as a valid site for knowledge production. Specifically, she is currently involved in research projects exploring the ways in which low-income urban dwellers' access to public infrastructure (housing and associated services) functions as a material and technical embodiment of their relationship to the state. Specifically, she is exploring this idea of 'infrastructural citizenship' through research on domestic energy innovation in low-cost housing in Cape Town and Bangalore. This approach uses the technical and political nature of public infrastructure to illuminate state/citizen relations.

Name: Professor Sarah Radcliffe

Contact: sarah.radcliffe@geog.cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Sarah's work examines the dynamics of postcolonial development in contexts of social and spatial exclusion, focusing on three areas:

I. Public policy and intersectional inequalities. This research has examined the colonial-modern forms of policy design and implementation, and the consequences for groups marginalized by race-ethnicity, gender, location and class. Between 2008 and 2011, Sarah was Principal Investigator on an ESRC research project into the experiences and critical knowledges among Indigenous women in two Ecuadorian groups. Sarah's book 'Dilemmas of Difference: Indigenous women and the limits of postcolonial development policy' (2015, Duke University Press) reported on this research.

ii. Policy infrastructures and state-citizen interactions. This strand of research seeks to explore how social inclusion is envisioned, implemented and experienced by policymakers, heterogeneous citizens and young people. Between 2011-14, Sarah was Principal Investigator on an ESRC project on Mapuche youth's understandings of citizenship and indigenous identity, in the context of peri-urban boarding schools in Southern Chile.

iii. Postcolonial states, Indigenous claims and disputes over governance. This research explores the complex dynamics of rights, power and difference unleashed by rights-based, 'not-quite-neoliberal' constitutions in Andean states, and what happens to Indigenous rights claims in these conditions. This research draws on decolonial feminism and Indigenous theory to raise broader questions about decolonisation.

In 2017, Sarah was Chair of the annual conference for the Royal Geographical Society working with the theme 'Decolonising geographical knowledges.'

History

Link to staff directory

 

Institute for Manufacturing

Link to staff directory

 

Land Economy

Link to staff directory

 

Latin American Studies

Link to staff directory

 

Law

Link to staff directory

 

Mathematics

Link to staff directory

 

MRC Biostatistics Unit

Link to staff directory

 

MRC Epidemiology Unit

Link to staff directory

Name: Dr Jean Adams

Contact: jma79@medschl.cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Dr Adams’ research focuses on social determinants of dietary behaviour and the evaluation of population interventions in dietary public health. Her current work includes evaluations of sugary drinks taxes in the UK and Barbados; an evaluation of the impact of supermarket ‘junk free checkouts’ on checkout food displays and purchases; and an exploration of the role of the planning system in restricting proliferation of hot-food take-aways. She has also conducted a broad range of research on the determinants and impacts of home cooking, and on socio-economic inequalities in diet and dietary behaviours.

Dr Adams is also happy to signpost applicants to others in the unit if they might be better placed to offer mentorship.

Music

Link to staff directory

 

Politics and International Studies

Link to staff directory

 

Psychology

Link to staff directory

Name: Dr Simone Schnall

Contact: ss877@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Dr. Schnall’s research investigates how bodily, emotional and social factors influence judgments, decisions and behaviours. Current research topics include judgments and decisions in moral and legal contexts, perceptions of the physical environment, and risky behaviours in finance (e.g., risk management in banks). In general she is interested in understanding why people often think and behave in seemingly surprising ways, and how to capitalize on insights from behavioural science to encourage adaptive choices in everyday life. Dr. Schnall would be glad to consider applicants proposing projects involving social psychology, cognitive science or behavioural economics.

Name: Professor Nicky Clayton

Contact: nsc22@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Nicola Clayton is the Professor of Comparative Cognition in the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS). Her research interests are in the evolution and development of cognition. Her research group studies the cognitive capacities of corvids (members of the crow family, which includes jays, ravens and rooks) because when it comes to cognitive capacities these birds are "feathered apes". They also investigate the cognition in young children as well as adult humans. They are especially interested in mental time travel, theory of mind and causal reasoning. Nicky read Zoology at the University of Oxford and then a PhD in bird song learning at the University of St. Andrews before returning to the University of Oxford as a University Research Fellow and a Junior Research Fellow at Linacre college, Oxford.

She was appointed assistant professor at the University of California Davis in 1995 and rapidly rose through the ranks to full professor and chair in animal behaviour in just four years. In 2000 she returned to the UK to take up her current position in the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge. She was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 2010.

She became Scientific Advisor to Rambert (formerly Ballet Rambert) in 2009-2011, and then Scientist-in-Residence ever since. 

Name: Dr Jon Simons

Contact: jss30@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Jon Simons is a Reader in Cognitive Neuroscience at the Department of Psychology.  He leads a research group that seeks to understand human memory, focusing particularly on the cognitive and neural processes that contribute to the subjective experience of remembering.  This work involves inter-relating cognitive hypotheses with evidence from functional neuroimaging of healthy volunteers and from examining how memory abilities change across the lifespan. 

Name: Professor Claire Hughes

Contact: ch288@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Professor Hughes' research (funded principally by the ESRC) includes a number of longitudinal studies to investigate social and cognitive influences on children's adjustment. In particular, she is interested in the causes and consequences of individual differences in children's executive functions (the higher-order cognitive skills that underpin goal-directed thought and action) and in children's understanding of mind (e.g., their ability to recognize that people can hold a mistaken belief about a situation). As well as the inter-relationship between these two abilities across development, she is interested in how these skills both transform and are transformed by children's close relationships (e.g., with parents, siblings and friends). Her studies include international collaborations with research partners in Hong Kong, Italy, the USA and the Netherlands; these collaborations are valuable in testing the cultural specificity or generalizability of their research findings.

Psychometrics

Link to staff directory

 

Public Health

Link to staff directory

Name: Dr Robbie Duschinsky

Contact:  rd522@medschl.cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Dr. Duschinsky’s research is related to social science and health, with a particular focus on mental health. His own work has addressed a variety of issues in this area including the assessment of child maltreatment and neglect; the context of common mental illnesses such as anxiety and depression in the lives of patients, and their treatment within primary care; and difficulties faced by clinicians in classification and the diagnostic process.​

http://www.phpc.cam.ac.uk/people/pcu-group/pcu-senior-academic-staff/robbie-duschinsky/

Social Anthropology

Link to staff directory

 

Sociology

Link to staff directory

Name: Prof Patrick Baert

Contact: pjnb100@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests:  Originally from Brussels, Professor Patrick Baert did his graduate work at the University of Oxford, working on social theory under the supervision of Rom Harré. He subsequently joined the Sociology Department in Cambridge. His recent research in the sociology of intellectuals has been funded by various bodies, including the British Academy, The European Research Council and the Leverhulme Trust. His writings have been translated into more than 10 languages. He is the chief editor of the International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society (Springer) and he also holds editorial positions at the European Journal of Social Theory, the Journal of Classical Sociology, Currently Sociology, and Distinktion. He has held visiting positions across the world, including the University of Cape Town, l'Université de Paris I Panthéon Sorbonne, the Humboldt University Berlin, Brown University, the University of British Columbia, the University of Concepcion in Chile and the LSE.  His research interests are in the following areas: sociology of intellectuals; sociology of culture; social theory; intellectual history. 

Name: Dr Brendan Burchell

Contact: bb101@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests:  Dr Brendan Burchell's first degree was in Psychology from Birmingham University from 1977-80. From there he went to Warwick University to take a PhD in Social Psychology, researching person perception under laboratory conditions. He then took a one-year post at The City University teaching social psychology, statistics and computing. His career took a change of direction when, in 1985, he was appointed to the Department of Applied Economics at Cambridge as a Research Officer to assist in a project entitled the Social Change and Economic Life Initiative, working collaboratively with economists, social psychologists and sociologists on a variety of aspects of labour markets and their effects on individuals. In 1988 Dr Burchell transferred from the Department of Applied Economics to take a Lectureship in the Faculty of Human, Social, and Political Science.  His research interests lie in the following areas: the effects of labour market experiences (e.g. job insecurity, work intensification, bankruptcy, zero hours contracts, part-time work, unemployment) on psychological well-being. The social psychological effects of precarious employment and unemployment. Gender segregation, men’s and women’s life cycle and career. Emotional reactions to personal finances: “Financial Phobia”.

Name: Dr Manali Desai

Contact: md644@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Dr Manali Desai received her PhD in Sociology from the University of California-Los Angeles where she trained as a comparative and historical sociologist. Her work encompasses the areas of state formation, political parties, social movements, development, ethnic violence, gender and post-colonial studies. Manali's first book State Formation and Radical Democracy in India, 1860-1990 (2007) was a historical analysis of the emergence of two different welfare regimes in India where social democratic parties have ruled consistently since independence. She has also published her research in the American Journal of Sociology, Social Forces, Social Science History, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Journal of Historical Sociology and Critical Asian Studies, among others. Manali has co-edited two books titled States of Trauma: Gender and Violence in South Asia (2009) and Building Blocs: How Parties Organize Society (2015).  Her research interests lie in the following areas: Manali's current work includes three projects: (1) Infrastructures of Gendered Violence: this is a two-year comparative project funded by the School of Humanities and Social Sciences on gender and sexual violence in urban and peri-urban India and South Africa; (2) A comparative study of colonial rule and long-term development in India funded by a grant from the Cambridge Humanities Research Grant. The project uses historical quantitative and qualitative data to examine state infrastructural power across India, and its effects on patterns of inequality, growth and basic goods provision; (3) Manali is also developing a project on class formation in urban India, examining strategies and practices of class mobility among those who are neither officially poor nor securely in the middle classes.

Name: Prof Sarah Franklin

Contact: sbf25@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Professor Sarah Franklin moved from the London School of Economics to take up the Chair of Sociology at Cambridge in October 2011. Since completing her PhD research on IVF at the Birmingham Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies (CCCS) in 1989, she has published extensively on the social aspects of new reproductive technologies. In 2012 she received awards from the Wellcome Trust, ESRC, and British Academy to establish the Reproductive Sociology Research Group (ReproSoc) which has since gone on to become one of the leading research centres in the rapidly expanding field of reproductive studies. Franklin has helped to establish several new fields in the social sciences including the 'new kinship studies', the social study of new reproductive technologies, and the cultural analysis of bioscience, biomedicine and biotechnology. She has had research funding from numerous bodies including the Wellcome Trust, ERC, ESRC, MRC, British Academy, Philomathia Foundation, Wenner Gren Foundation, Carnegie Foundation and Mellon Foundation, among others. Franklin's current research concerns the early history of UK IVF and she has worked closely with colleagues in the history of science as well as reproductive biology to develop new interdisciplinary approaches to the study of the intersection between reproduction and technology. Through her work on IVF, Franklin has developed new theories of both biology and technology, focussing on the use of biological tools, and the relativization of the category 'biological'. This model, of biological relativity, is the subject of her most recent book and builds on her previous introduction of the terms 'transbiology', 'embodied progress', and 'hope technologies'.  In addition to directing the Reproductive Sociology Research Group, Franklin is a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator, co-Editor of the journal Reproductive Biomedicine and Society, and Chair of the Anne McLaren Trust. 

Name: Dr. Mónica Moreno Figueroa

Contact: mm2051@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Mónica is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Cambridge. Her research, teaching and publications have developed around three main topics: the lived experience of ‘race’ and racism with a focus on Mexico and Latin America; feminist theory and the interconnections between beauty, emotions and racism; and visual methodologies and applied research collaborations. Mónica has lectured at Newcastle and Princeton and Nottingham Universities, Goldsmiths and Birkbeck College, and El Colegio de Mexico. At Cambridge, Monica has established the provision for teaching on race and racism, as well as intersectional and transnational approaches to social issues relating to race, gender and class oppressions. She co-leads the Decolonising the Curriculum Faculty Initiative and is currently the University Race Equality Champion. Monica has just completed a research project on blackness, representation and women’s economic trajectories in the Costa Chica in Mexico; is currently in the middle
of a British Academy funded project on Institutional Racism in Oaxaca, Mexico
and is the PI since January 2017 of a large ESRC research project on antiracist practices and discourses in Latin America comparing experiences in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico.

Name: Dr Darin Weinberg

Contact: dtw23@cam.ac.uk

Background & interests: Dr Darin Weinberg received a B.A. in sociology and communications from the University of California, San Diego in 1984; an M.Sc. in social philosophy from the London School of Economics in 1985, and Ph.D. in sociology from U.C.L.A. in 1998. After teaching for three years at the University of Florida, he joined the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences (now HSPS) as a University Lecturer in 2000. He held a Lindesmith Fellowship for Drug Policy Studies, from the Lindesmith Center of the Open Society Institute in 2000-2001. He has been a fellow of King's college since 2001, and a Reader in the Department of Sociology since 2012. In 2011 Darin won the Melvin Pollner Prize in Ethnomethodology from the American Sociological Association's Section on Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis and the Outstanding Article Award from the Social Problems Theory Division of the Society for the Study of Social Problems.  Darin’s research focuses primarily on the practical purposes to which concepts of addiction, mental illness, and learning disability are applied in various historical and contemporary contexts. He is particularly interested in how these concepts figure in state sponsored campaigns of social welfare and social control, and in what their uses reveal about how and why people distinguish the social and natural forces held to govern human behaviour. Beyond these specific research interests, Darin is also more broadly interested in social theory, the sociology of science, sociology of health and illness, and qualitative research methodologies.

Theoretical and Applied Linguistics

Link to staff directory

 

Veterinary Medicine

Link to staff directory

 

Last updated: 4 December 2017